Some Of The Different Techniques Used Under Trick Photography And Special Effects

Have you ever seen pictures that make subjects look more elaborate, fanciful and ethereal than what they really are? Well, these pictures are made following a variety of approaches which fall under one type of photography. Today, you will be oriented to some of them as well as how to achieve them. That way, you do not remain oblivious to the facts behind such interesting and exciting visual art pieces. To clarify, the photography style that we are going to discuss is that of trick photography. And what makes it unique from all other types is that it distorts reality and make things seem like something they are not.

First on the list would be making a brokeh, which is a photography technique that manipulates light and out-of-focus points to highlight certain elements within the photograph that are not visually clear when taken through the normal perspective. To achieve it, a photographer must deliberately use the shallow focus technique or lens that specifically creates blurred images and then take out of obscurity the small background lights which fill the area. It is normal to come up with bad bokeh outputs when you are starting out because its often very challenging to manipulate things that are out of your control. But with practice, you will eventually master it and move on to other techniques such as the Tilt-Shift Effect.

This particular photography procedure involved the use of camera movement and selective focus to elicit or simulate a moving picture. The tilt actually refers to the rotation of the lens plane relative to the image plane and it is responsible for making one aspect of the photo look sharp; while the shift corresponds to the movement of the lens parallel to the image plane. This part is what adjusts the position of the image without have to move the camera back and forth. And as you can see, it is another complicated trick photography and special effects method. But it is quite an amazing fete once you master it. And you can apply to a lot of subjects, from a busy street to an on-going football game.

Finally, you have Rear Curtain Flash Sync, which is also known as Slow Sync. It makes use of two flashes to capture the first image in a still and the second image while in movement, thereby creating background details that are trailing. All a photographer has got to do to achieve it is adjust the flash settings on his SLR camera and establish a Second Curtain Sync with a slow shutter speed thats one fiftieth of second slower. This technique is particularly effective for flash photography that involves controlled movement in a dark setting with lit backgrounds. Yes, as expected, this will also be as difficult as the first two featured. But you will be able produce amazing pictures once you get the hang of it.

No doubt, it will feel intimidating aspiring to recreate trick photos that professionals make. And for a while, it will also be discouraging. But with practice, you will be able to achieve anything. So have the heart to learn and pursue your interests.